Despite Orange County Board of Supervisors Rejecting Michelle Steel and Don Wagner’s Motion to Allocate $75 Million of CARES Act Funding Directly to Cities for Businesses, $15 Million Will Be Given to Each District for Allocation

Today, the Orange County Board of Supervisors rejected Supervisors’ Michelle Steel and Don Wagner’s motion to Allocate $75 Million of CARES Act Funding to Cities for Businesses. Thirty-one of 34 mayors in Orange County had supported this proposal, with a number of them as well as dozens of business owners speaking in favor of the motion at the May 26th board meeting. Unfortunately, in a 3-2 vote, the board for the second week in a row rejected a motion to allocate $75 million in CARES Act funding to a Business Recovery Grant Program to be administered by cities.

Instead, the money will be divvied up amongst the five respective districts, with each receiving $15 million, which each Supervisor will have discretion over. Chairwoman Steel, however, has committed to allocating $15 million directly to the cities in her District to be given to the businesses operating in those cities. The cities will be receiving these funds in the next few days and will be given those funds.

“I trust that city governments have a better understanding of the needs of their local business community,” said Chairwoman Steel.  “For that reason, I will be allocating my share of the $15 million directly to the cities in my district.”

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First elected to the Orange County Board of Supervisors in 2014, Michelle Steel represents the residents of the Second District, which includes, Costa Mesa, Cypress, Huntington Beach, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Newport Beach, Seal Beach, Stanton, the unincorporated area of Rossmoor, and portions of Buena Park and Fountain Valley. Steel, a successful businesswoman and renowned taxpayer advocate, previously served as Vice Chair of the State Board of Equalization where she represented more than eight million people in Southern California, including all of Orange County, as one of the state’s 12 constitutional officers.